Upcycled Shutter Breakfast Table

I hope you all had a great Labor Day weekend! Did you take a little trip, or just hang out and relax around the house? We were busy little bees around here. There were so many things we've been meaning to get done, so we used the three day weekend as an opportunity to catch up on some projects. We worked on our yard, cleaned up our flower bed, planted some new trees and flowers, propagated our succulent garden, moved our bird feeder so the squirrels will stop eating all the bird seed, caught and relocated a possum, roasted some Hatch chiles for some upcoming recipes, and made this awesome table! I am so excited to share this project with you! This is the best thing we did over the weekend, but watching Keith try to catch a possum runs a close second! More about that later this week.

Lately I've been racking my brain trying to figure out how to fill this big empty space in our front room. It's kind of been the last room on our list since we don't use it much, and haven't really figured out what we want to do with it. For now, it is where all of our extra furniture lives, which isn't much to begin with. There is a big window on the North wall that overlooks our flower bed, and I started thinking, Wouldn't it be nice to have a cute little breakfast table that overlooks our garden? It could double as a bar table when we are entertaining. We had four tall bar stools laying around from the old house that would be perfect for seating. I had it in my mind that I wanted it to be tall and narrow, so that it wouldn't take over the room so much as add interest and a nice little spot to sit. Just somewhere Keith and I could enjoy our breakfast and a nice cup of coffee, that wasn't as formal as our dining table. Sometimes it seems a bit much when it's just the two of us sitting at this big ol' six person table.

Inspiration struck while Keith was away on business two weeks ago, and I was cruising my favorite local thrift shop. Tucked away against the wall were these two amazing shutters that had the perfect amount of distress, no damage to speak of, and were only $15 each. I must have stood and stared at these shutters for over a half hour. I would leave and come back to them, trying to decide exactly how I could use them, and if I indeed needed two. In the end I bought both, and figured that if I didn't need two for this project, I could certainly find another use for the extra one. I proudly went home with my new old shutters, and immediately started researching ways to build a base. When Keith came home, I was so eager to show him! We looked over tons of pictures on Pinterest, until Keith had the brilliant idea of reusing the old  pipes we had from our Pipe Shelving Project! Genius! We aren't allowed to put holes in the walls at our new place, so the entire project has just been languishing in our basement since the move. Approaching it like an Erector Set, Keith came up with a perfect configuration that only required us to buy a few small pieces to complete. I love it when my hair-brained schemes work out! When our powers combine, Keith and I are an unstoppable DIY force! Check out the process and finished product...

 

These are the amounts of each pipe and fitting we used. Longer pipes could easily be substituted for several shorter ones for more efficiency, or more pipes added for stability. We used these because we already had them.

These are the amounts of each pipe and fitting we used. Longer pipes could easily be substituted for several shorter ones for more efficiency, or more pipes added for stability. We used these because we already had them.

We spray painted the base a flat black.

We spray painted the base a flat black.

Cut two boards the width of the shutters and painted them white to match.

Cut two boards the width of the shutters and painted them white to match.

Used 1" screws to attach the base to the boards.

Used 1" screws to attach the base to the boards.

Used 1 1/2" wood screws to attach boards to shutters.

Used 1 1/2" wood screws to attach boards to shutters.

The boards were screwed to solid areas of the shutters so as not to go through the slats.

The boards were screwed to solid areas of the shutters so as not to go through the slats.

We originally had another 48" pipe running along the lower part in the front of the base, but removed it so that we could push the chairs under the table.

We originally had another 48" pipe running along the lower part in the front of the base, but removed it so that we could push the chairs under the table.

What do you guys think?